Change the way you think about sales

Sales is slimy, right?

It turns people off, right?

You’d never want to be a salesman, right?

News flash: If you’re a gym owner, or even a coach at a gym, you’re a salesman. You sell stuff, right? Then you’re a salesperson. Instead of fighting this and feeling bad about it, consider rethinking your perception of how you think about sales.

Longtime professional sales coach Greg Mack asks you to think about sales as an interview between two people. 

It’s not about pushing something on someone that they don’t want or need, Mack said.

“I don’t want you to think…it’s your job to convince them or influence them to make a decision to buy what you do whether they need it or not. This is the problem with modern selling.”

It’s your job to find out the who, what, where, why, when, he explained. And from those answers, you can find out the prospect’s real needs, which will help you discover if you’re a good fit.

“We’ve got to put our question hats on and interview them and get them talking about these things and asking questions about their answers so that they dig deeper,” he said. Get them talking about it and then ask questions about their answers.

MadLab CEO Craig Patterson reiterated this when he said:

“Sales is just communication to get to the truth…Sales is dead honesty…It’s about two human beings trying to get to the bottom of something.”

Like anything else in life, sales is a learned skill, Patterson reiterated. And it takes time. But once you embrace it, it can be fun.

“It’s the ability to enrol others in your abilities, your dreams, your thoughts,” he said.

By doing this, you get to connect with people, get to know their dreams, and get to the bottom of a simple question:

“Are you a good fit to be training with me?”

And if they’re not a good fit, that’s OK, too, both Patterson and Mack agree. In that case, you can both honestly agree that you’re not going to move forward with the relationship.

One final thought about sales:

Sales people without expertise and without integrity are what give it a bad name, Patterson said.

But someone with something real to offer—a professional coach with expertise and integrity, for example—shouldn’t feel slimy or devious about actively seeking clients who are a good fit to drop money on a service that will help their lives.

The moment you realize this, the more success you will have in business, and in life.

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